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that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
that joke about bob is that he is a lovable guy. [laughter] are we going to make a speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. bob is a great guy. this is on c-span and he will say why are you defending me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. on june 12, 19 and seven he told soviet premier gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world
commanded our respect in a remarkable way. part of it was because of his service in the war. he and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye, of course, later was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling the story that when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he wrote senator dole a note and said, "i'm here. where are you?" because both of them, when they were recovering from their war wounds, had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress. inouye got here first. a few years ago senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se m
here that is capable of fixing our problems. bob -- earlier this year, bob carr, foreign minister of australia -- one of our greatest allies in the world -- said -- and i quote -- that "the united states is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence." the u.s. is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence, perhaps because some -- i'm so proud of this country, i'd say we're one budget deal away from restoring our global dominance for a considerable number of years. unfortunately, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from connecticut, so like -- you've probably seen these numbers, but just to bring it home in one state, what will be the impact if we go over -- if we allow the country to go over the fiscal cliff. in connect
. during that, he met a lifetime friend, future majority leader bob dole, another young gi who had been also wounded in the european theater. senator dole told senator inouye he planned to go to law school and eventually serve in congress. dan inouye was elected to congress in 1959 as hawaii's first congressman. bob dole was elected to congress a year later. senator inouye always joked, i went with the dole plan, and i beat him. three years later, dan inouye was elected to the senate being a soft powerful voice for the people of hawaii ever since. although senator inouye was an unabashedded progressive democrat, he always put his country first and his party second. dan was a vibrant and vital presence in the senate, and in death, he'll remain a legend. his last words on earth, aloha, and it is with a heavy heart that i, we, bid aloha, good-bye, to a friend of the senate, daniel ken inouye. >> good morning. on behalf of the united states house of representatives, i extend sincere condolences to senator inouye's family, colleagues, and his constituents. in late 1963, a young freshman sena
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
and bob dole, our former colleague, literally were wounded at about the same time in europe and were in the same hospital recovering from tremendously serious wounds. senator inouye of course was awarded the congressional medal of honor for that. senator pryor was telling a story that's when senator inouye was finally elected to congress he rode senator dole aide notes that said, i am here. where are you? because both of them when they were recovering from their war wounds had determined that one day they wanted to serve in the united states congress and inouye got here first. a few years ago, senator inouye and senator ted stevens invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens, of course another world war ii veteran, had flown the first cargo plane into what was then the king in 1944 and of course senator inouye was well regarded in china for that service. so the group of senators, there must have been a dozen of us from both parties, got more time with mr. hu and mr. wu the one and two leaders of china than almost the present of the uni
last point because my mind is on -- of course to say we need to learn about bob and these guys, locke's second treatise of government comes out of -- who argues for monarchy. and monarchy is looking better and better in the middle east. if there's one country that seems to have figured it out, so far, is morocco. and maybe that should be a model for other places in the region as well. >> thank you, bret. brian. >> my basic arguments for our side of the debate, an argument for reality of opening your eyes and seeing where we are today, two years into these uprisings and these changes. and in a region of the world just narrowly focused on the middle east which has about 20 countries, you have seen political change at least the leadership in four of them. in two of those countries we've seen islamist forces come to power through the ballot box. in the two others, islamist political parties are playing some sort of role, more marginal in libya. we are at the start of the process, and i think our response from washington has been very sort of philosophical and intellectual but not very ope
the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about the distinguished your times columnist tom friedman is labeled a flout world. instead little interest to readers to recruit decidedly unfashionable figures who will push of a heart against the notion that geography and a longer matters. so i want to just ask you to start with the basics of geography and tell us why the matter so decisively in the world. this is a pablumized by tom friedman's work greatly is what we can do is all the things. what i'm doing is saying find that human agency, that's fighting against things but what i'm showing you in this book is the other side, i'm not disagreeing with what they said but should i take back to the formidable barriers which if you do not respect you can never overcom
to the senator about that. first, we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has beco
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
at it and speaking of coming back at it, we have a second bite of the apple for bob. >> we are familiar with statistics that the u.s. spends significantly more percentage of gnp on health care than any other developed country. we hear that continuously. what i was surprised to hear at a recent conference was exactly the reverse is true when it comes to social support spending for lower income groups for seniors and people with disabilities or things like this. which raises the question in my mind would it be better for us to rebalance our spending in this direction to provide better quality by providing support services that allow people to stay in their homes functioning well instead of institutionalizing them which is very expensive. >> we need to figure out how to spend more sensibly and efficiently in health care no matter what else happens because it makes no sense. we know it can be done in a smarter way. the question about how and how much kind of support structure is a very large one. i will say that most, not all, most of the people who are now institutionalized in long-term ca
that they were going to firewall is off the ticket. it was run by bob hannigan the national chairman who ran the st. louis machine that got chairman rehab acted in 1940 and ed pauly. at holly was the kolshorn yet oil millionaire who said i went into politics when i realize it was cheaper to elect a new congressman to buy the old one. he leaders going to get indicted for good reason. >> host: his name is on the -- >> guest: the build alien -- the pavilion, exact way. they decided they would try to surround roosevelt with all the people who were hostile to wallace if wallace is on the ticket. in 1941 when henry luce made his famous speech wrote his editorial saying the 20th century's going to be the ends century and the united states is going to dominate the world economically and military old and culturally coming made a famous speech. the 20th century should not be the american century, should be the century the common man so what we need is the worldwide people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and the russian revolution and called for ending impe
are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing
spent on friday about an hour with bob kerrey. bob kerrey and i reflected back on his experience here in the senate and one memorable meeting that he and i had. and the purpose of that meeting was for bob kerrey to introduce me to the presiding officer. and it was a wonderful meeting because when the meeting finished -- i won't go into detail on everything i said but the presiding officer knows -- i came out of that meeting recognizing how what kindred spirits these two gallant warriors are and were. both having been highly decorated, one in the navy, the other a marine. one medal of honor, the other -- the presiding officer -- navy cross, silver star, more than one bronze star for valor, a number of purple hearts. as i said again, but i can't say it too much, what an honor and pleasure it has been to serve in this body with the senator from virginia, jim webb. i've learned so much about what difference a positive attitude will make. no better example of that is the new g.i. bill of rights. to think that a new senator, a brand-new senator would have the idea, the confidence that i can
to bob's recent book that when the cia brought the idea of this -- these drones, and he was recorded to have said kill the seniors, you americans worry about collateral damage and don't worry about things like that. of this is the first time in our young history we allowed foreign power to kill our citizens, for free, for nothing. at the same time, there's amazing initiative that come into place since the government has taken power so in 2009, last summer, we had the prevention of electronic crimes act, which applies to anyone of any nationality across pakistan, and carries jail sentences so if you have an e-mail address not registered in your fall name, that's a jail sentence of six months. if you are found guilty of spoofing or character assassinating the president, that's three years to 13 years. what constitutes that? is it a blog post? that's unclear. you also have this incredibly inept and criminal way the government has handled the floods. while the floods raged, they embarked on a pr join to the cross, dubai, france, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, imposs
't clear minded enough or clear eyed enough about the russians. bob gates also, who had moved over to deputy national security advisers. that little group kind of delayed the process for six months because the people in state were ready to progress with what had been achieved at the end of the second reagan administration. but it really delayed things. the person who turned that around who also deserves a great deal of credit was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an interagency management, and different players, and spent a good deal of time, would arrive in moscow with an entourage, with the negotiators, jim woolsey from csc, the relative assistant secretary, broke them into working groups and continue the process raws participated in, there was a delay. i don't think there were any problems as a result. >> just wanted to say james baker was named secretary of state the day after george bush was selected. within a week he met with regional assistant secretaries to understand their priorities. my priorities were opportunities and challenges to include ea
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
been submitted to bob patrick and the veteran's history project at the library of congress. for years and years researchers can find the interviews and use the stories for the future projects. these men represent the less than 2 million world war ii veterans living today. men and women who fought across the world, to defend and protect not only our country from harm, but something much more fundamental. our freedom. freedom is the big ideal. it's used a lot used in washington, d.c. i sometimes wonder if it lost the potent sei. when joe was liberated. there was out pouk on the cot next to him. he died that soldier died the day after the liberation fobbing -- took place. the wall behind me reminds all that many paid the ultimate prize. those who made it home hugged their families, returned to work, and hardly ever talked about the war again. this me more yule allowed them to open and share the sometimes. sometimes for the first time ever. on the day he was liberated joe was asked about the experience and he said he learned two things. to pray at the nazi prison camp and every day is a b
him to in michigan, senator inouye made his two lifelong friends, one senator bob dole, who as we know, became majority leader here in the senate and the republican nominee for president of the united states. and his other lifetime friend is the late senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate and the hart building, the massive senate office building, is named after him. asked by his son why after being classified as an enemy alien he and the members of the 442nd fought so heroically, senator inouye said in his usual, calm man, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. he was a recipient of the medal of honor, a congressional gold medal, the highest honor can bestow. he served the distinguished service cross, a bronze star for valor and, of course, a purple heart. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress he displayed on if battlefield. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting that i had, i mentioned it very previously last night but it was ten days ago. i knew se
provide greater efficiencies. we were able -- bob gates before me begin that effort, achieved about, i believe about $150 billion in savings. we've added about 60 to 70 billion on top of that, in terms of further efficiencies. we'll continue to review where greater efficiencies can be achieved. right now, and i asked, i asked that question when he first became secretary. you know, what is the role of the service secretary, vis-À-vis the service chief? and the reality is that there is an important role for them because they are civilians. civilians are involved in providing policy in their areas. they also have to negotiate a lot of the politics of capitol hill. so there is an important role for them to play in terms of their particular service. but having said that, there are a hell of a lot of other places where we can achieve savings in the pentagon, and we will. >> as the defense department deals with the downsizing the services, have you considered cuts to the number of flag and general officers? >> you know, again i think, i think that's part and parcel of, as you do force reduct
sons, mark, bob, john and david, and the entire lugar family, most of which is with us here in the galleries today. their strength and sacrifices have been indispensable to my public service. i'm also very much indebted to a great number of talented and loyal friends who have served with me in the senate, including, by my count, more than 300 senators, hundreds of personal and committee staff members, and more than a thousand student interns. in my experience, it is difficult to conceive of a better platform from which to devote one's self to public service and the search for solutions to national and international problems. at its best, the senate is one of the founders' most important creations. a great deal has been written recently about political discord in the united states, with some commentators judging that partisanship is at an all-time high. having seen quite a few periods in the congress when political struggles were portrayed in this way, i hesitate to describe our current state as the most partisan ever, but i do believe that as an institution, we have not live
to avoid the sequestration. >> bob samuelson, "washington post". i think the proposals are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000, and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there's much speculation thamuch speculr cuts in the pentagon budget would reduce the additional cuts in both the army and the marines. if the marines was put in a position where it had to occupy and protected the oil field of the persian gulf for an extended period of time say five or six years are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the reasons at least i was able to get through as chairman is to try not to speculate much on hypothet speculate much on hypothetical. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now, and i think they are in the 13 budget, so basically they have been on the hill, the beginning of them they have been on the hill for the better part of a year and they are reductions both of chiefs of those to services and the chairman also. clearly, and i did as well when i was the chairman over year ago, there was a need to come down. there was an expectati
took it as a personal question you could almost see interface to redress that she and bob dole have never had a child. she said we'd never have children. it was really just an abstract kind of question. the next day the media said she's not ready for the campaign trail because she's not talking like a kennedy. she's talking to this person away. all of a sudden within three weeks, her campaign had folded. i think michael dukakis problem in terms of presidential debates that he was asked whether he would do, he gave a lawyerly and their, a defense of his opposition to capital punishment. all of a sudden we said this and this guy have a human side of all? it's one of those things we see into the capabilities of the year of the individual. al gore because those he's been pointed out as the serial exaggerator. any one of those stories you could explain away he'd never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create the internet. and then to have the perception of being in a laboratory and doing it. he was support creative creating the arpanet, but he had that story in a story tha
counterintelligence executive, the director, bob bryant, one of the best of the key issues of the national security arena. what makes a stand that is the bipartisan dialogue, intellectual rigor, timeliness, and readability. a must read for practitioners and policy makers and the general public. i take with of would like to do that this point is sort of explain how the book came about. the person going task to do that is bernie horowitz. as briefly explain the process by which he decided to come about to write this book. >> good afternoon. i would like to thank the committee on law and national security for giving me the opportunity to work on this book project. if he told a couple of years ago , i was still at college that soon thereafter are be working gun national security policy book, would have told you were crazy. i have been to a number of committee events in the past and i often hear panelists described that only now we seem national-security will really come into its own separate field and seeing enterprises like welfare in national security loan center will reviews and journals popple ball
the fiscal cliff. senator bob corker also spoke to reporters. >> good morning. i am lamar alexander. this is my colleague bob corker. merry christmas to you three points to make and then i would like to introduce cementer corker. here is the first point. when the dust settles and everything is said and done, federal individual income taxes are not going to go up on almost all americans next year. that needs to be settled this weekend by the votes and after the first of the year, so that's the most important point for americans to know. for almost all americans when the dust settles taxes, individual income taxes won't be going up next year. all the talk is about taxes but what we should talk about today is the medicare fiscal clef, the looming bankruptcy in the program that seniors depend upon to pay the medical bills for the millions of americans who are counting the days until they are eligible for medicare so they can afford the medicare bill, it would be a tragedy if when they get to that day there isn't enough money to pay the bills but according to the medicare trustees that d
republican senator bob corker discussed the january fiscal deadline at an event hosted by bloomberg government and deloitte consulting. see that at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all the services end up having so many cracks at the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you've got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? of course now we've got the institute of medicine report pain 30% of everything we do may not be necessary and health care. when we step back from a 30% of all the medications are prescribed come to test the order come, the procedures, this is something i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> defense secretary, leon panetta went to walter reed military medical center to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary and to pay tribute to medical professionals in the military. the hospital was created out of the merger of walter reed army medical center
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
they took him to in michigan, senator inknew -- senator ininouye, two phones, bob dole, and the republican nominee for president of the united states, and this other lifetime friend is senator phil hart, who was known as the conscience of the senate,, a massive senate office building named after him. senator said in his usual calm manner, for the children. and for the children there could be no finer role model than senator dan inouye. congressional gold medal. highest honor congress can bestow, the distinguished service cross, bronze star for valor, and of course, a purple hurt. dan inouye showed the same dedication in congress as he displayed on the battle field. i want to take just a little bit here, mr. president, and talk about a meeting i had -- i mentioned it briefly last night, but it was ten days. i knew that senator inouye was not feeling well, so i went down to his office, and he has a remarkable office. it's a beautiful office. but there isn't one single frame on the wall depicting what great man he is. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his
-night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this shit? [laughter] spent ask him a real question. i decline. [laughter] >> okay. last night talked about a new direction. one of the things that you talk about is -- [inaudible] and how to mike higher education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind
minded enough, clear-eyed enough about the russian. bob gates also, who moved over to national security. that little group kind of delayed the process i would say for about six months. the people let state i think were ready to kind of progress, you know, with what had been achieved toward the end of the second reagan administration. but it just really delayed things, because the person who turned that around, and he also deserves a great deal of credit, was jim baker. jim baker did a great job putting together kind of an inter-agency management for this process and the different players and he spent a good deal of time, i would say a year and a half or two years, arrived in moscow with an entourage with the negotiators from cfd of the relevant assistant secretaries. broke them into working groups and i think that process that ros participated in with schivinovski and gorbachev but there was a delay and i don't think it set us back. i don't think there were any problems as a result of that. >> thank you. >> i was just going to say that james baker was named secretary of state the day af
by a republican -- by a republican majority leader. senator bob dole was the first one to use the first so-called filling the tree. used it seven times. senator byrd, who never used it, that gag rule to stop the minority from offering amendments, i guess, was disappointed he hadn't thought of it so he found a way to use it three times as he was the majority leader. senator mitchell used it three times, senator lott 11, senator daschle only once this gag rule, senator frist 15. all of those leaders used it 40 times. our majority leader, senator reid has used it 68. so we can all come up with statistics on both sides, but shouldn't we just resolve that what we would like to do, show the country that we're grown-up, responsible adults and we can sit down and say, yes, we can agree on ways to make sure that most bills come to the floor and senators get to offer most of the amendments that they want to offer on the bill? i think we can do that. i think there's a spirit on both sides of the aisle to do that, and i'm working toward that goal, and i know a number of democrats and republicans are d
.r.s., these are the numbers. since 1985, senator bob dole filled the tree -- used the gag rule -- seven times. senator byrd used it three times. senator mitchell used it three times. senator lott, when he was majority leader, used the gag rule 11 times. that is, cut off amendments. senator daschle only one time. senator frist, 15 times sm. those are the majority leaders. since 1985, awful those majority leaders -- all of those majority leaders used it a combined 40 times. our current majority leader, senator reid, has used it, as of yesterday, 69 times since he became leader in 2007. this trend, this gagging of the minority, is the primary cause of the senate's dysfunction. so, madam president, i wanted to correct the record. made a mistake and i'm glad to come. i don't want senator dole get the credit for that when senator byrd actually figured it out of and i want to leave a more -- i want to leave an optimistic -- i want to conclude with an optimistic point. i think most of us -- and i would include the distinguished senator from new hampshire in the chair because we've been together in discussions, bip
other young men, a soldier from kansas named bob dole, and one from michigan named phil hart. they formed a lifelong bond, one that endiewrd all the way to the u.s. senate. in 2003 when we dedicated that
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
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